Review: 1975: The Seven by Sarah M. Cradit

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☆☆➹⁀☆ 4 stars ☆➹⁀☆☆

 

What It’s About:

1975. New Orleans. The Deschanel siblings are far from children now, some having kids of their own, others settling into the possibility, as they make choices that will shape their futures forever.


Charles, the playboy, finds new meaning as a father, and swears off his old life, littered with indiscretions. Augustus, the fixer, sees his marriage further dissolve just as he learns his wife is pregnant. Colleen, the adherent, is head over heels in love in Scotland, but worries their relationship won’t hold up once he learns her dark secret. Evangeline, the genius, escapes to New England, letting her education be the balm of choice for her broken spirit. Maureen, the haunted, discovers her true purpose as a mother, but fears her arranged marriage will create the instability that drives her daughter down a path too similar to hers.

Elizabeth, the anguished, recovers from the damage wrought by her past choices, and finds penance in helping Augustus with his own struggles. But, for the first time, she will have to do it without her lifeline, Connor, who has been sent away by his parents.

As the family progresses through the seventies, they’ll discover the power of secrets, lies, and a fate they cannot escape, no matter how wealthy or powerful they are. 

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My Thoughts:

In 1975: The Seven, some loves are lost and some are rekindled, there are births, deaths, and the righting of paths…at least for the time being.

The story of the Deschanels in the 1970s is coming together. For fans of the House of Crimson and Clover saga, the future has become clearer with fantastic backstory explanations. For new readers, this 1970s series is a great place to start. With each installment Ms. Cradit gives readers the drama they crave, the answers they need, and she even includes some happy-for-nows.

In 1975 readers see the passive-aggressive behavior of the possessed or mental ill Ekatherina. Being highly sensitive, Augustus is uxorious in his responses to Ekatherina’s acrimony. When tragedy strikes, can the self-righteous Noah “walk the talk” and accept his lover for who she is? When crass Charles and acidic Cordelia come to loggerheads, he finds an unique if not wholesome solution. Unfortunately, conniving Catherine may throw a wrench in the works, but Charles knows Colin remains clueless to his wife as usual.

“Are we ever ready for any of the shit life throws at us?”

The novella culminates when the family is together again for Christmas at Ophiele—including new additions to the clan and some lost souls.

“The memory of Maddy was dimmest here, for they’d treated Ophélie as a summer home only, until after she died and Mama had the idea that the family estate was where they needed to be to heal. Her ghost was everywhere anyway, no matter where they were on Christmas Eve, because this would always and forever be Maddy’s day. She’d unintentionally sealed her name on all future December 24ths and there was nothing to be done about it.”

 This is the best installment to date. It included a strong plot with most of the Deschanel siblings’ stories moving forward. Certainly, as Ms. Cradit gets closer to the end of this series, she is weaving the young sibling’s stories into the already established future of House of Crimson and Clover, and it is a delight to read her tapestry. There were a few crass phrases and sex scenes that I felt were unnecessary and detracted from the story, but overall, the writing quality and world building are excellent. I am really looking forward to the rest of the series, especially Elizabeth and Evangeline’s stories.

 

 

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